Problem Solvers Caucus Praises Consensus Calendar House Passage of Bipartisan PAST Act in Key Utilization of New House Rules

July 25, 2019
Press Release

WASHINGTON  Problem Solvers praises colleague and fellow Caucus member Kurt Schrader (OR-05) on the Consensus Calendar win with passage of H.R. 693, U.S. Senator Joseph D. Tydings Memorial Prevent All Soring Tactics Act of 2019. The bill received priority consideration on the House floor by having more than 290 bipartisan cosponsors – an instrumental new house rule the Problem Solvers Caucus led the fight for earlier this Congress.

H.R. 693 would amend the Horse Protection Act of 1970 to designate “soring” among the unlawful acts under the Act. Soring is a practice used by horse trainers to deliberately inflict pain in order to exaggerate the high-stepping gait of their horses and gain an unfair advantage at horse shows, which involves using chemical agents such as mustard oil and diesel fuel to burn the horses’ legs to accentuate their leaps. This bill also bans the use of all devices implicated in the practice of soring.

"New Jersey is home to thousands of companion, show, and sport horses. I believe we need to do all we can to protect horses from cruel practices like soring," said Rep. Josh Gottheimer. "That is why I was proud to co-sponsor the bipartisan PAST Act and I commend Congressman Schrader on his leadership combating this issue.”

“We care about ensuring all animals are treated fairly and are not abused. This is just another common sense bipartisan bill to reach the floor thanks to the Problem Solvers Caucus implemented House rules,” said Rep. Tom Reed.

“Horse soring still runs rampant even though laws have been on the books for decades banning this cruel practice,” said Rep. Kurt Schrader. We gave folks a chance to self-police, but the abusive behaviors continued. The bill that was passed today will strengthen and improve current regulations by improving USDA enforcement, increasing civil and criminal penalties, and banning incentives to sore horses. This is a historic day and I am grateful for my colleagues who worked tirelessly to get this legislation across the finish line and for the beautiful horses that we love so much.”

“As a member of the Animal Protection Caucus, I am committed to fighting animal cruelty in all forms,” said Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick. “The PAST Act would protect horses from undue pain and distress, and I am proud to join the Problem Solvers Caucus in endorsing this important piece of legislation.”

Rep. Fred Upton said, “Horse soring is a cruel and sad practice that must come to an end. I’m pleased to be a cosponsor of H.R. 693 and to see it pass. This bipartisan legislation will prevent these beautiful animals from being mistreated by the walking horse industry and provide protection from future soring practices. I hope to see the Senate pass this legislation so we can get it to the President’s desk for his signature.”

“It’s time to put an end to the practice of horse soring once and for all,” said Rep. Dan Lipinski. “The PAST ACT is commonsense legislation that helps do away with an outdated practice that can cause pain, distress, inflammation, or lameness. I appreciate the work of the Problem Solvers Caucus to get bipartisan bills as overwhelmingly popular as this one to the floor for a vote.”

"Horse soring is cruel, painful and unnecessary—we're working to end this harmful and dated practice, and we're doing it in a bipartisan way,” said Rep. Salud Carbajal. “I'm glad to stand alongside my colleagues to pass the PAST Act and put a stop to abusive horse soring."

“Horses have a special place in American culture and they deserve additional protections from needless cruelty. I am proud to support the PAST Act to end the painful practice of horse soring, and I am pleased to see this bill pass the House with strong bipartisan support,” said Rep. Anthony Brindisi.

 

The Problem Solvers Caucus is a bipartisan group in Congress comprising 48 members – equally divided between Democrats and Republicans – who are committed to forging bipartisan cooperation on key issues. It is co-chaired by Congressman Josh Gottheimer (D-NJ) and Congressman Tom Reed (R-NY).

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